It's people that truly translate words

People often don't realize that research is an important part of translation. You have to make yourself familiair with a new topic that comes with its own terminology and jargon. As a result, you read and learn a lot while you work.

And this appeals to me since I love to learn about new things.

For example, for four years I have been working on a technical translation project. I visited their factories, I met their employees, and I watched quite some YouTubes. By now, I know quit some about their manufacturing process, though there is still much to learn.

What's the proper procedure when engaging a translator for a book project?

Writing a book is special event. Usually, someone has been brooding on a idea for a long time before he or she commits it to paper. Therefore, a well-written book is elaborate, without becoming repetitive.

When you want to have a book translation, it's very important that the translator is contacted on time since book translations take a lot time. The translator has to be creative, and also here the maxim goes that a rush job translates itself into work of poorer quality.

Always have someone else proofread the translation. At a certain moment one gets blind for the typos and grammatical errors in a text. The only solution for this is to have someone with a fresh look go through it.

Book translations are fun to do and provide a translator with work for a longer period of time. It's therefore not difficult to find translators who are willing to do them.

I have a website that I would like to have translated into Dutch. Or I have a flyer or brochure or a couple of blog posts that need to be translated. I can do these things for you. "Localization" is the official term. It means that you do not only render a faithful translations, but also tailor the translation to the target audience. In other words, it requires soms translation and some writing.

For a period of one year, I have been translating blogs, e-books, and other online communication materials for Boostability, an international company offering SEO services to small and medium-size businesses. I have also translated websites, brochures , PowerPoint presentations, flyers, and online product descriptions.

I have followed a course in SEO for translators, and I have Adobe InDesign.

I would like to have a manual translated? Is that something you do?

Yes, it is. I translate such documents on a regular basis. I work with a translation software program called SDL Trados Studio, which keeps the layout intact and makes sure that all technical terms are translated consistently.

For many years, I have translated work instructions and safety instructions for an industrial manufacturer. I am also the regular translator of manuals for bike seats and bike helmets, and I am familiar with terms such as EN and ISO.

I read that you worked at the Erasmus Medisch Center in Rotterdam. Do you also do medical translations?

That's very perceptive of you. Yes, I have worked there for 10 years and I have seen quite some scientific research during that time.

I have also written news articles on oncology research and for a brief period I was the editor of the newsletter of kanker.nl, the central online platform in the Netherland with information about cancer.

So, I certainly do medical translations, depending on the subject. I have translated patient information, manuals, descriptions of medical devices, course material for nurses and the well-known informed consent form.

Do you also do Dutch to English translations?

I hear this question often. "Rather not", is my standard reply since you are usually better off hiring a native speaker. However, there are instances when a non-native speaker suffices; for example, beceause the content is general and a good translation is enough, it doesn't have to be a perfect one.

In short, yes, and I have done so in the past. I have also written and published articles in English. If need be, I can ask a native speaker to proofread my translation.